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A little more than 15,000 miles on the track

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  • BruceV
    started a topic A little more than 15,000 miles on the track

    A little more than 15,000 miles on the track

    Been awhile since I posted anything, the only riding I have done in the past 3 years has been on the track. This past year with Covid really impacted how much I went to the track, I did about about 12 or 13 days, I typically to double that.

    In the past 6 years I've logged a little more than 15,000 miles on the track, and I hope I'm not jinxing myself writing this, I've stayed on two wheels for all of those miles.

    I'm an okay rider, who every once in awhile when the stars align, can actually have a fast day. If I had to use one word to describe myself on track, it would be "smart" I feel that I have excellent awareness for the track conditions, the riders on track with me, and I never lose sight of actually how good or not so good of a rider I am. All of these attributes have served me well, so far.

    I never forget - the only thing that can happen at the track is how much money the day is going to cost you. I'm not racing - I'm certainly not getting paid to be out there, I'm not going to win a trophy or win points. So when that competitive urge does kick in, so far I've not let it get the best of me and made bad decisions. Bad decisions will only get you hurt or get your bike wrecked or both and they all cost you money.

    I've had many oh shit moments for sure - I've been hit twice, both times I've stayed up, really nothing to do with my skill, just luck, and in both instances I was happy to have more luck than skill on my side.

    So most of you know that I've been riding an S10000RR since 2012. I'm on my 3rd one and unless something really changes my mind over the winter, I will be saying goodbye to the mighty S1000RR.

    It is an awesome motorcycle, more HP than anyone needs, very sophisticated machine, lots of electronics, all of them have been bullet proof. But the reality is especially for me, it is really hard to ride the bike, so much HP and it really is a little on the heavy side and as good as it is, it steers hard. It is expensive to run, my average tire bill just for the RR per season just about $5,000.00 yes $5,000.00.

    I do run a Yamaha R3 as well - now that bike is totally different than the RR - no HP, no electronics so you have to ride the bike, nothing going to save you - very cheap to run - a few sets of tires for the entire season - under $1,000.00.

    But going from the RR to the R3 is a challenge or going from the R3 to the RR. They are so different, from the speed to the braking to the weight difference - it may seem like no big deal, but when you are going way faster on the RR all your reference points, tip in points, everything happens much sooner because of the speed, now pit in and switch to the R3, holly smoke - I almost go off the track in every corner, I'm way to early for everything.

    So after 3 years of trying to ride both of these bikes well, I decided something was missing - and what was missing was a 600, I've been told for years get a 600, all around best bike for most tracks, didn't listen until this year. Bought a Honda CBR600RR completely setup for the track. I think I found the love of my life - well as far as motorcycles go.

    So yes now I ride 3 bikes, but mostly the 600, It is easier to ride than my S1000RR, if you are into lap times, yes I ride it faster than the S1000, less expensive to run as well.

    I didn't make it to any of the iconic tracks this year - stayed close to home, again Covid had a lot to do with it.

    Here is a video the last day I went to the track this year - riding my old, 2007 CBR600RR, no electronics no frills, just my limited skills.



    https://youtu.be/E1J7C1f1e0k




  • justjoe
    commented on 's reply
    Does Matt stop talking? Now that's funny. As a matter of fact, I would love to see the chat battle you two could wage!!

  • BruceV
    commented on 's reply
    JC I'm having the most fun riding my almost 14 year old CBR 600RR. A Kramer would be an awesome addition to the fleet, they weigh 275 lbs. with a full tank of fuel, that is awesome.

  • BruceV
    commented on 's reply
    Matt I am truly going to make every effort to get to one of your events in 2021 .How many times can I keep telling you this before you stop talking to me?

  • JCW
    replied
    There’s being aggressive when riding on your own. Then there’s being aggressive trying to pass.
    when passing someone, the room you allow for error should be greater than what you are willing to risk when riding alone. People don’t get that sometimes and let it all hang out, finding their limit when passing someone. Bad timing...

    nice to hear from you Bruce. I’m riding a 9yo gsxr750 and don’t think I’ll ever “need” another track bike. I’ll ride the whole day with the dB killer in the muffler and have plenty of excitement. Stopping and turning has always been harder than whacking the throttle open for me anyway.

    ‘I’d love to get a used Kramer or a AP fz07r... now the race season is over, a few bikes are showing up wera forums.... the temptation is great.
    Last edited by JCW; 11-03-2020, 03:49 PM.

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  • MattB
    replied
    Originally posted by BruceV View Post
    So are you concerned about this because when we all finally get to the track together, you are wondering how many chances they are going to give us to behave??
    That's a good joke right there, Bruce, you coming south to get together with us... I've been hearing that story for 4 years now. Don't worry, I'm ready for more of your stories and company, I'll come north again in 2021, Calabogie, NYST, and Palmer.

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  • BruceV
    commented on 's reply
    Bobby both the Yamaha and Honda have nothing in regard to ABS, traction control, fly by wire, you name it they don't have it. It certainly makes you think about what you are doing. The BMW is very sophisticated, I do run it with the traction control on, has it ever saved me, not sure, has it kicked in, many times. In all the laps I've done on the BMW only once did the ABS activate that I was aware of.

    Mentally I still feel I'm sharp enough to ride a pretty good pace at the track, physically is a entire different story.

    I was interested in buying Rick's (K-K) K1200GT, that was my first BMW, I can't ride more than 30 minutes without my back really hurting. No sense buying it and only looking at it.

    The race track works out most of the time - no stop and go - leaning forward actually feels good, and just about when my back starts acting up, I'm coming off the track.

  • Bobby
    replied
    Bruce, nice to hear from you. It's been awhile. Great write up. I will say that I can relate to having a rather basic bike. My Suzuki s1000f only has basic traction control and abs. It does have a slipper clutch which works great and I've learned how to power shift it without a quick shifter. Sometimes I miss not having integrated brakes though. But oh well. It's definitely sharpened my skills, which at my age is a good thing for everyone. Glad your back man.
    Last edited by Bobby; 10-26-2020, 11:16 PM.

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  • Loggiebone
    commented on 's reply
    Agreed. Allowing four to happen is negligence. I’d bet it is more of an organizational issue...no means for coaches to advise each other or to keep “score”

  • BruceV
    replied
    If four coaches spoke to that rider honestly they should have ended his day, after the 2nd time, it should have been one more time and you are out of here.

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  • justjoe
    commented on 's reply
    No, I’m not concerned with us being hoons. But it did happen that a guy was way too aggressive and ended up running into Bill. I think he was making such aggressive passes trying to move up into the advanced group.

    Come to find out, four separate coaches had counseled the knucklehead. Somewhere along the way they need to take action.

  • BruceV
    commented on 's reply
    Joe as you are finding out, some orgs run a tight ship and others not so tight. When we sign all the waivers we pretty much are on our own. Sure anyone can try to go after the org and on occasion someone does, but it is not easy to prove negligence. The two best ways for the day to run well, the org has coaches on track that pay attention and the riders (us) inform the org of someone riding badly.

    Not always but a lot of the times, the real problem is riders are in the wrong group, either they are way to fast or not enough experience to be the faster group. I see it all the time riders just want to be in the fast group, even when they shouldn't be, some sort of bragging rights crap.

    Typically I ride in the fast groups but on occasion I will ride in a slower group because I don't know the track, the org will not let me ride in the fast group until they see me ride a few sessions, or one of my friends is in the slower group and I want to ride with them. My ego is not so big that being in a slower group bugs me, only one of two things is going to happen, either I am doing just fine in that group or I'm passing everyone and the org throws me out of that group.

    So are you concerned about this because when we all finally get to the track together, you are wondering how many chances they are going to give us to behave??

  • justjoe
    replied
    When does the org become responsible for the action(s) of a negligent rider? After the first time the bad actor is counseled? The third time? Fourth?

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  • BruceV
    commented on 's reply
    Wes number one concern for me is a rider taking me out. I'm certainly capable of making a mistake and in turn going down because of it, that I can accept. Getting taken out at a trackday event is really hard to chalk up as part of the risk, yes it is part of the risk but it should be the rare occasion, but unfortunately it is a little to common.

    The organization I ride with mostly is really good at keeping the race mode in check for the most part. If they see a rider doing questionable moves, they make them pit in and if they can't get the rider to understand the situation, they simply end their day.

    I ride in the expert/racer group so passing inside and outside happens. But if a rider goes into race mode they reel the rider in pretty quick to cool them down.

    The good thing about riding with the same org a lot, you get to know the riders you are on track with, so it makes it a lot easier to be out there, you get to know how that rider rides.
    Last edited by BruceV; 12-19-2020, 01:43 PM.

  • Doctor350
    replied
    Great write up and video Bruce

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